Summer 2018: College of Applied Behavioral Sciences

Addictions Counseling Programs Announced

The University of Indianapolis is supporting the nationwide fight against addiction with the introduction of two new graduate programs in Addictions Counseling. The Master of Arts in Addictions Counseling and the Interprofessional Certificate in Addictions fill a growing need locally and nationally to combat the addiction crisis.

Dr. John McIlvried’s Retirement Celebration

The University honored the career of Dr. John McIlvried with a retirement celebration. In 1981, Dr. McIlvried was just one of two psychologists serving the Behavioral Sciences department. By the time of his retirement in 2018, he was responsible for the establishment of clinical psychology at the University, the development of the Psy.D. program, and growth of the School of Psychological Sciences.

All of these initiatives have contributed to the formation of the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences. Under Dr. McIlvried’s leadership, the Psy.D. program was accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and the American Psychological Association – an achievement made possible by his unflagging work ethic.

In addition to his achievements at UIndy, Dr. McIlvried also made significant contributions to the field of psychology and the American Psychological Association. The unit joined the National Council of Schools of Professional Psychology, and Dr. McIlvried was instrumental in helping to develop competencies for graduate students that are still being used in training programs today. He has also published on training programs and ethics. Best wishes to Dr. McIlvried on his retirement!

Student Awarded Fellowship

Jazmin Atzhorn ’19 (M.A., mental health counseling) received a Minority Fellowship Program Services for Transition Age Youth (STAY) fellowship from the American Psychological Association. The fellowship program supports master’s level training for clinicians who hope to work with transitioning adults.

Effects of Risk-Based Firearm Seizure Laws

A new study by Aaron Kivisto (assistant professor of clinical psychology) provides evidence that risk-based gun seizure laws are saving lives. The study, “Effects of Risk-Based Firearm Seizure Laws in Connecticut and Indiana on Suicide Rates, 1981-2015,” appears in the June 2018 issue of Psychiatric Services. Peter Phalen ’18 (Psy.D. in clinical psychology) was co-author.

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