NewsSpring 2013

Milestones of UIndy History

 

 

 

 

In honor of the March inauguration of Rob Manuel (page 5), we present a few highlights of UIndy history.

1902
Indiana Central University founded after Church of United Brethren in Christ accepts developer offer of 8-acre campus, $40,000 worth of buildings.

1904
College Building (later Ad Building, then Good Hall) completed.

1905
Rev. Dr. John T. Roberts elected first president; doors open to 74 students, 10 faculty.

1906
Baseball team formed. Philomusea Literary Society for men formed.

1907
Philalethea Literary Society for women formed.
Enrollment exceeds 100.
Title obtained; campus and College Building dedicated.

1908
Normal Dept. accredited to prepare teachers for certification; ICU Academy accredited.
Irby J. Good, one of first two grads, elected to faculty.
New Good Hall generator allows replacement of oil lamps.

1909
Dr. Lewis D. Bonebrake elected second president.
First issue of Oracle yearbook.
First campus master plan.
Treasurer reports a cash balance—$3.62.

1910
Indianapolis Light, Heat & Fuel Co. electricity replaces generator.

1912
Pres. Bonebrake delivers 88 addresses to assemblies, dedications, commencements, etc.

1913
Bonebrake buys Model T for travel to engagements.
Student Volunteer Band formed.
Accredited by United Brethren Church Board of Education.
Home at 1397 East Russel Ave., Roberts Hall, rented for food service and women’s dorm.
Tornado damages College Building; roof replaced.

1914
Debating team formed.

1915
Professor I. J. Good ’08 elected third president.
Basketball team formed.

1917
Faculty dress in academic regalia for Commencement.

1919
First fund-raising campaign nets $330,000 on $250,000 goal.
College Improvement Association incorporated to help obtain 50 acres north of Hanna.
Enrollment of first international student, from Sierra Leone.

1920
Second campus master plan.
First campus clean-up day.

1921
Trustees change ICU’s name (except in legal transactions) to “Indiana Central College.”
University accredited as a “standard college” by state board.
Dailey Hall (later Residence Hall, then Buxton) and the Barn, “temporary” gym, built.

1922
Third campus master plan.
Reflector first published.
Women’s dorm, first campus building north of Hanna, built, named Dailey Hall; original Dailey named Residence Hall.
First athletics director and professional coach hired.

1923
Men’s Hall (later Trimble) built.
$500,000 campaign begun; ends with $125,000 raised.
Football team formed.

1924
First campus tug-of-war (freshmen win); first Senior Recognition Day.
Tennis team formed.

1925
First ICC Homecoming and first May Day Festival.
Track team formed.

1926
New Hall (later Wilmore), second campus building north of Hanna, built.
Students pick “Greyhounds.”
Final Academy class graduates.

1927
Men’s C Association founded.

1928
Noblitt Observatory dedicated.
Campaign for $500,000 ends with $458,943.90 in cash and pledges. Mostly pledges.
Campus mortgaged for $190K.
Football dropped.

1932
Creditors, including faculty, forgive half of debt; rest funded with 3-year notes, 5% interest.
University Heights United Brethren Church dedicated.

1933
Baseball team undefeated.

1934
Debt of $232,356; $14,000 per year renegotiated to $190,000 interest-free until last semi-annual payment due in ’55.

1935
Enrollment exceeds 500.

1940
Student Christian Association founded.

1941
Victory Campaign begins.
Women’s “C” Association founded; unbeaten basketball team ranked 9th among all U.S. college, university teams.

1943
World War II causes drop in enrollment below 150; campus is Navy V-12 site; Army Air Force establishes preflight training detachment.

1944
Robert Hiatt, last “C” man on campus, inducted into Navy.
Victory Campaign tops goal with $435,000 pledged.

1945
Dr. I. Lynd Esch inaugurated as fourth president.
ICC indebtedness liquidated.

1946
ICC is Evangelical UB-affilia-ted after church mergers.
Football reinstated.
Student Council, Faculty Women’s Club founded.

1947
College accredited by North Central Association; Phi Alpha Epsilon (freshman) Epsilon Sigma Alpha (senior) honor societies founded.
ICC becomes Hoosier College Conference charter member.
Married student housing: six surplus WWII Army barracks.

1952
Baseball team undefeated.
First all-school Brown County Day; tradition lasts 50 years.

1954
Enrollment again exceeds 500.
Evening division: city’s only such 4-year bachelor’s program.

1955
President’s residence, Nelson House, built.

1956
Golden Anniversary Fund hits $641,000; estimated cost of Academic Hall rises from $600,000 to about $1 million.

1957
To complete Academic Hall, ICC borrows $500,000; no schedule for payment and no collateral, except $100,000 of insurance on life of Dr. Esch.

1958
Academic Hall (now Esch) completed for $1,750,000; Commencement in new auditorium (later Ransburg); The King and I is first show there.
Golden Anniversary campaign (1951–58) hits $1,000,000.

1959
David Young receives Danforth Fellowship; Virgil Keefer receives Fulbright Fellowship.

1960
New gym (later Nicoson) built; the Barn is razed.
Evening Division enrollment exceeds 1,000.

1961
Showers Lectures in Christian Religion endowed.
Krannert Hall, women’s dorm (now Cravens), built.

1962
WICR 88.7 FM: on the air.
Lilly Science Hall built.
Cummins Apartments for married students built.

1963
School of Nursing established.

1964
Evening Division tops 1,500.
Noblitt Observatory razed.

1965
Leah Ransburg Fine Arts Gallery dedicated.
Master of Arts program re-established after 1918 halt.

1966
Schwitzer Center built.
Day Division tops 1,000.
American Humanics Foundation Program debuts (fourth in U.S., first in a city).

1967
Combined enrollment in credit programs tops 3,000.

1968
Hanna Avenue widened from two to four lanes.
With church merger, affiliation becomes United Methodist.

1969
First ICC coed dorm (New, then East, then Warren) built.

1970
Dr. Gene E. Sease inaugurated as fifth president.
Key Stadium completed.

1971
Dr. Leon G. Zerfas $1-million gift is ICC’s first such gift.

1973
Lilly’s Zerfas Wing completed.
Last literary societies fold.
Karen Rogers is Miss Indiana.

1975
Trustees vote restores “Indiana Central University” after years of “Indiana Central College.”
MBA program established.

1977
Krannert Memorial Library completed.

1978
Executive MBA program, 1st in Indiana, established.

1979
North Hall residence completed (later named Cory Bretz Hall).
Wilmore Hall residence razed.

1980
Physical therapy grad program, 1st in Indiana, established.

1981
University begins associate’s program in Nicosia, Cyprus.

1983
Restructuring brings schools of Business, Education, Nursing, and Krannert Graduate School of Physical Therapy; Occupational therapy grad program, state’s 1st, launched.
Ruth Lilly Center for Health & Fitness built.

1984
Good Hall listed on National Register of Historic Places; Dailey Hall razed.

1985
Sutphin Lectures in Humanities endowed.

1986
Name changed to “University of Indianapolis.”
Women’s golf team formed.

1988
Trimble Hall damaged by fire, razed; New Hall dormitory built (later named Crowe Hall).
Dr. G. Benjamin Lantz Jr. inaugurated as sixth president.

1989
University of Indianapolis-Athens chartered.
First Ceremony of the Flags saluting international students.

1990
Speech team earns national title.
BUILD program for learning-disabled, 1st in Indiana, debuts.

1991
International students top 100; 37 countries represented.
Fourth campus master plan.
First plastic food cards, electronic tracking in dining hall.
Bookstore remodeled in lower level of Schwitzer.

1992
Enrollment tops 3,800.
School of Business accredited.

1993
Cable TV comes to dorms.

1994
Syndicated columnist William Raspberry ’58 wins Pulitzer Prize for commentary.
Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center dedicated; Good Hall renovated.

1995
Clinical Psychology doctoral program established; Odyssey in Athens program launched.
University’s Indiana license plates debut.

1996
Parish Nursing Program debuts.

1997
Major campus renovation and beautification program begun.
Social work program renamed for professor Phylis Lan Lin.

1998
Dr. Jerry Israel elected seventth president.
Final Oracle yearbook.
Center for Christian Vocations, School for Adult Learning debut.
Krannert School of Physical Therapy offers doctorate in Health Science; 1st distance-learning course offered in School of Business.
Smith Mall dedicated; ground-breaking for Martin Hall.

1999
President Israel inaugurated; south wing of Krannert Memorial Library named Sease Wing; Center for Christian Vocations renamed Lantz Center.
Martin Hall dedicated; Lilly Hall rededicated.
New policy allows weekend 24-hour visitation in two dorms.

2000
Buxton Hall razed; Asian Programs created; Wheeler Arts Community opens.

2001
Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning launched with $15-million Lilly Endowment grant; Center for Aging & Community launched.
Stierwalt Alumni House, Central Hall built; Schwitzer Student Center expanded.
School of Psychological Sciences established; first earned doctorates (health science) awarded; School of Occupational Therapy doctoral program launched.

2002
Centennial Celebration; $50-million campaign launched.
CAC offers gerontology master’s.
Brown County Day replaced by fall break.

2003
$50-million campaign goal reached two years early.
Master’s in Midwifery, first in Indiana, established.
Sue Willey ’75 is University’s first female director of Athletics.
Ecumenical & Interfaith Pro-grams, Educational Leadership master’s, University Press debut.
Gates Foundation grants $11.3 million to CELL.

2004
Full-time undergrads top 2,000.
School of Occupational Therapy offers doctoral degree.
Athens campus assumed; Mar Elias Campus in Israel opens; program with Ningbo Institute of Technology debuts.
WICR 88.7 FM becomes state’s first public digital station.
Au Ho-Nien Museum opens.
Top Tier ranking from U.S. News; School of Nursing ranked.
Lilly Endowment’s $1 million funds research opportunities.

2005
Dr. Beverley J. Pitts named eighth (first female) president.
Capital campaign reaches new $65-million goal early.
50,000-square-foot Esch Hall addition completed.
One Card student services system implemented.

2006
UIndy nickname adopted;  campaign ends $20 million above 1st goal; grad student enrollment exceeds 1,000.
Study-abroad program with Galen University (Belize) debuts.
Smoking banned.

2007
Richard G. Lugar Center for Tomorrow’s Leaders, College of Health Sciences launched; LEVA video lab, first of its kind, debuts.
DeHaan Endowed Gerontology Chair, Faculty Senate created.

2008
50,000-square-foot Schwitzer Student Center expansion done.

2009
CELL receives $7.5-million Lilly Endowment grant.
National Chapter of the Year: UIndy College Mentors for Kids.
East Hall, first “green” building on campus, opens; Cummins Apartments razed.
Katie Stam is Miss America.

2010
CELL to manage state’s $32.7-million schools effort.
Athletics & Recreation Center erected; Wimp Baumgartner Softball Field established.
Total enrollment tops 5,000.

2011
“Five Mayors” panel hosts current and four former mayors.
Institute for Civil Leadership & Mayoral Archives, Zhejiang Yuexiu University of Foreign Language program launched.

2012
Dr. Robert L. Manuel named ninth president.
Doctor of Nursing Practice, 1-year MBA, Adult Learning master’s degree, Kinesiology master’s debut.
Renovation of Hanna Avenue completed and dedicated.
Crowe Hall renamed for Ray ’38 and George ’43 Crowe.
Roberts Hall opens; named for first president.

2013
Strategic planning process and Vision 2030 exercises completed; Robert L. Manuel inaugurated.

Marty
the authorMarty